Gateway Arch

Three Children’s Books about the Gateway Arch

If you grew up in the St. Louis area, chances are you visited Gateway Arch on a field trip. For kids in the Lou, a visit to the Eero Saarinen’s massive piece of architecture is a rite of passage. But it doesn’t have to stop there. For parents wanting to excite young students about St. Louis and its attractions, look to these books from local authors.

The Most Awesome Arch!, written and illustrated by Jae Johans
Meet Archie the squirrel. His “favorite thing in the whole wide world?” The St. Louis Arch. After deciding he’ll visit the grand attraction on a sunny afternoon, he tells his friend the butterfly, who isn’t as jazzed about the Arch. After embarking on his journey to it, Archie meets such characters at Pierre the goose, Laclede the beaver, Quigley the turtle, and more who give Archie even more reasons to appreciate St. Louis’ perhaps most famous spot. Collected all his facts—such as that the Arch is built on the same site as the French colony that became St. Louis and how the history of Lewis and Clark plays a role.

To The Top! A Gateway Arch Story, written by Amanda Doyle, illustrated by Tony Waters
Follow Ella and Jake, siblings on an adventure to the city’s iconic Arch with their Grandpa. Like many siblings the brother-sister duo differs in what they want out of a trip: As Jake rushes to finally make it to the top, Ella is more excited in learning about how the structure came to be. Grandpa leads the two children through the museum, with Jake nearly pulling the three into the tram car and to the top. Bonus for any budding history buffs: The back page calls out some of the best Gateway Arch fun facts.

 

What’s That Arch?, written by Sandra Kreitner, illustrated by Alvin Zamudio
For a Dr. Seuss fan, this children’s story is carried by rhymes. What’s that Arch? Well, the book says, it’s a reminder of the history of the land we live on, starting with the bison and Native Americans. Of course, Missouri historic figures including Lewis and Clark make appearances, alongside the grand Old Courthouse. It’s a quick and easy read, aimed at beginner readers.

Article originally posted by STLMag